Things to do and see when on holiday in Wales
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Things to do in West Wales

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Kidwelly Castle

n the castle occupies above the town.
Cadw. Crown Copyright.

Devil’s Bridge

hour to climb from Aberystwyth to Devil’s Bridge. There are paths down through the valley alongside the raging river and many other walking and biking trails in the area, set in spectacular woodland scenery.

Cenarth Falls

d upstream. Near Newcastle Emlyn, the peaceful village of Cenarth also has the Coracle Museum to offer, showing the details of coracle construction and coracle examples from around the world. Cenarth is one of only a few sites in Britain where it is possible to see coracles still in use. Also of interest is a 13th-century flour mill once owned by King Edward I, and a 18th-century bridge. There are some lovely walks along the river, and pay and display parking available.

Llangrannog Beach

iant’s tooth. At low tide, you can walk past this rock to the hidden sandy cove of Cilborth. There is also a steep cliff path from the village to Cilborth which is not affected by the tide. From Llangrannog you can walk to the spectacular headland of Ynys Lochtyn with its hidden beach and a small island which is only accessible at low tide. Those who want a longer walk can join the spectacular Ceredigion Coast Path which follows a 60 mile route along the Cardigan Bay coastline. Car parking is in a small carpark next to the beach or there is free parking in the upper part of the village. A shuttle bus operates between the upper car park and the beach during the summer. Food is available from the two public houses, the Pentre Arms and The Ship, two cafe/restaurants, Patio Cafe and The Beach Hut and there is a general store, Glynafon. There are other shops, general stores, pubs and restaurants within easy reach of Llangrannog. Toilets and disabled toilets are located in the village. Lifeguards are on patrol from June to September. Dogs are allowed on the Cilborth side of the beach but are not allowed on the main section of the beach area between Nant Hawen and Pen Rhip between the 1st May and 30th September inclusive. Awards Cilborth - Blue Flag and Seaside Award (Rural). Traeth y Pentref - Seaside Award (Resort)

Cilborth Beach

lborth, accessible when the tides allow. Access to the beach is either via the cliff and a steep flight of steps, or from Llangrannog beach when the tide is low. Surfing, sailing, windsurfing and kayaking are popular activities and for walkers Ceredigion Coast path passes through Llangrannog with opportunities to spot seals and dolphins from the cliff paths. Wild flowers are abundant in spring and a wide range of sea-birds can be seen nesting on narrow cliff ledges. Car parking is in a small carpark next to the beach or there is free parking in the upper part of the village. A shuttle bus operates between the upper car park and the beach during the summer. Food is available from the two pubs the Pentre Arms and The Ship, two cafe/restaurants, Patio Cafe and The Beach Hut and there is a small general store. There are other shops, general stores, pubs and restaurants within easy reach of Llangrannog. Toilets and disabled toilets are located in the village. Lifeguards are on patrol from June to September. Dogs are allowed on the Cilborth side of the beach but are not allowed on the main section of Llangrannog beach area between Nant Hawen and Pen Rhip between the 1st May and 30th September inclusive. Awards: Seaside Award, Green Coast Award

Tenby Castle Beach

the closest but fills up quickly in summer. If you arrive after 11am during the school summer holidays, head straight for the park and ride and use the free shuttle bus. Food: café on Castle Hill plus numerous cafes, pubs and restaurants around the beach and in Tenby town. Toilets and disabled toilets on Castle Hill Lifeguards: on duty from the end of June to the end of September. Dogs: Dog restrictions apply to the whole beach west of St Catherine’s Island from 1st May to 30th September. Awards: Seaside Award (Resort) and Blue Flag

Milford Waterfront

ants, boat trips, Milford Haven Museum, galleries, a bowling alley, hair and beauty salons and a marina, there’s something for everyone. Facilities – Free car parking available, child friendly, disabled facilities, dog friendly, exhibitions, food and drink facilities and free activities.

Aberystwyth North Beach

, dark sand and shingle beach has both Blue Flag and Seaside Awards. As well as a programme of entertainment at the bandstand, there are traditional seaside treats such as donkey rides, crazy golf, and amusements at the Victorian Pier. The beach is patrolled by RNLI lifeguards during the summer months. On clear days, the beach offers wonderful views of North Wales, including the peaks of the Llyn Peninsular and Snowdonia. Car parking: Limited roadside parking along the promenade and car parks and street parking in the town. Disabled parking spaces on the promenade. Food: A wide selection of food and drink available on the promenade and in the town. Toilets and disabled toilets and showers close to the beach. Lifeguards on duty during the summer school holidays. Dogs are not allowed between the north side of the Landing Stage and the northern end of the beach at Craig Glais from 1st May to 30th September. Awards: Blue Flag, Seaside Award

Aberystwyth South Beach

Bay’s porpoise population at sea on warm days and there are spectacular views down the coast. Just behind South Beach is Aberystwyth’s harbour and marina full of sailing boats and yachts. Fishing trips for visitors are available from the harbour during the summer months. Aberystwyth town, with its full range of shops and services and other attractions including the camera obscura, castle ruins and the National Library of Wales, is a short walk away. Car parking: Pay and Display parking along the promenade and car parks and street parking in the town. Food: A wide selection of food and drink available on the main North Beach promenade and in the town. Toilets and disabled toilets near the Castle and Harbourmaster’s Office Lifeguards on duty during the summer school holidays. Dogs are not allowed between the north side of the Landing Stage and the northern end of the beach at Craig Glais from 1st May to 30th September. Awards: Seaside Award

Clarach Beach

ets. The clean beach is popular with bathers, water sports enthusiasts and walkers and there are lovely views of the bay with the possibility of spotting seals, porpoises or dolphins. A scenic cliff-top walk leads to Aberystwyth over Constitution Hill and has fabulous views over Cardigan Bay. A longer inland footpath, via Llangorwen passes through a nature reserve. Car parking: On the north side a small, free parking area overlooks the shore. Food is available from a café, bar and takeaway and a wide range of food and drink is available in Aberyswyth on the promenade and in the town. Toilets near the beach. Lifeguards patrol in the school summer holidays. Dogs are not allowed on the beach between the 1st of May and the 30th of September. Awards: Seaside Award

Borth Beach

ntersected by groynes. The gently shelving golden sand is especially popular with families with younger children; the tide goes out a long way, so its shallow waters are great for the little ones to paddle in and splash about. It’s a good beach for surfing as far up as Ynyslas. At the southern end of the beach, an ancient submerged forest is exposed by the ebbing tide. Welsh legend has it that the trunks and tree stumps are the remains of the land of Cantre'r Gwaelod, which disappeared under the waves of Cardigan Bay, long ago. The Cors Fochno Bog behind the town is part of the Dyfi Biosphere, the only UNESCO Biosphere reserve in Wales. The reserve also includes the Dyfi Estuary and the beautiful sand dunes of Ynyslas. The Wales Coast Path passes through Borth, leading north to Snowdonia and south to Clarach and Aberystwyth. Car parking: free parking opposite Brynowen Holiday Park and along the sea wall. Parking on the High Street fills up quickly in holiday season Food: plenty of cafes, restaurants and pubs in Borth and the surrounding area. Toilets and disabled toilets Lifeguards: July to September Dogs are not allowed on the beach between The Cliff and the Youth Hostel from 1st May to the 30th September Awards: Blue Flag, Seaside Award

Penally Beach

outh and Castle Beach. Pembrokeshire Coast Path passes close to the beach. From the beach there are views across Carmarthen Bay towards Caldey Island, inhabited by the monks of Caldey Abbey. The island is rich in plant and wildlife and small boats provide trips across from Tenby in the summer months. Car parking and toilets: Free parking with toilets can be found at Penally Railway Station. From here a pathway leads past the golf course to the beach although this pathway is closed when the adjacent MOD firing range is in use. Food: Pubs, restaurant and shop in the village, more facilities in nearby Tenby Lifeguards: no lifeguard service Dogs are allowed on the beach all year round Awards: Seaside Award and Green Coast Award

Carreg Cennen Castle

and travel back 700 years in your imagination. A collection of native rare breeds of cattle and sheep can be seen on the fields surrounding the castle on the working hill farm. The whole site is privately owned and run by the Llewellyn family, who have farmed there since the 1700s. Margaret Llewellyn is in charge of the extensive selection of homemade food which is served daily in the tea rooms on the farm yard which double up as a ceremony venue for weddings and parties. This building is worth a visit in itself - cleverly designed to capture 'snapshots' of the scenery through its many windows, it is wonderfully rustic in atmosphere with its large oak beams and Welsh slate. Cadw membership schemes apply.
Cadw. Crown Copyright.

Llanrhystud

rocky and backed by a large caravan park. On clear days the beach has views towards Snowdonia to the north and Bardsey Island to the north-west. Ceredigion Coast Path passes through the village and along the beach where part of it continues along the top of a shingle bank, which has been levelled as much as possible to provide a reasonable walking surface. The beach is popular for a late swim, surfing, a barbecue or just to sit and watch the sun go down. Car parking: Just to the rear of the beach is a small free car park and parking is possible on the shingle overlooking the shore. Food: You will find a pub, cafe, supermarket and post office in Llanrystud and the next towns for supplies are Llanon, Aberaeron and Aberystwyth. Toilets: No beach facilities. Some facilities in the nearby caravan park. Lifeguards: No lifeguard cover Dogs are allowed all year but please be considerate to other beach users and remember you must always clean up after your dog. Awards: Seaside Award

Llanerchaeron

ng organic farm and two restored walled gardens. The lake and waterwheel have recently been restored. There is a small shop selling local produce and Llanerchaeron farm produce and plants. Check the website for details of guided tours and events such as the Easter trail, plant fair, shearing day, brewing weekend, children's activity days, learn-about-farming day and apple week.
©NTPL/Andrew Butler

National Wetland Centre, Llanelli

hways and admire the water gardens. Children can wander the Swan Maze and crawl through the tunnels of Water Vole City. Families can learn about wetlands in the interactive indoor Millenium Discovery Centre and then take a canoe safari and explore wetlands in a whole new way. Then you can relax in the comfort of the Estuary Café and enjoy delicious home cooked food, panoramic views and amazing wildlife.

Cors Caron Nature Reserve, Tregaron

h century, there are great opportunities for walkers. Two waymarked circular routes start from the car park - a riverside walk (sorry no dogs), and a fully accessible boardwalk which includes an observation building. There are resting places around both routes, and the toilets in the car park are open at all times. Walkers, cyclists and horseriders can also enjoy the Ystwyth Trail, which passes along the edge of the reserve.

Aberystwyth Cliff Railway

ystem until electrification in 1921, The Aberystwyth Cliff Railway has a uniquely designed undulating track and tilted carriages, the work of George Croydon Marks. Powerful motor and high-tensile steel cables, supported by a sophisticated electronic safety system, haul the carriages to the summit at a stately 4 miles per hour. In Victorian times, Constitution Hill was a popular visitor attraction similar to modern day theme parks and even today it attracts many visitors each year. A century later, we can retrace the steps of our ancestors who travelled this funicular to the hilltop recreation area of the Victorian ‘Luna Park’.

Llanelly House

glish or Welsh let you to learn about the 300 year old history of the house, and hear the stories of those who used to live in it, from the owners to the chambermaids. There are activities for children, ghost tours, and a restoration tour focusing on the work done between 2011-13. The Stepney family were a major influence in the industrial development of the region, and Thomas Stepney was a Member of Parliament for Carmarthenshire. He rebuilt the house in 1714, creating one of the finest 18th-century town houses in Wales. The foundations and certain parts of the house also date to Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean times. The house deteriorated and was only restored as recently as 2011, opening in 2014. Although prior booking is essential, this historic site is well worth a visit. There is disabled access, but the flooring is uneven so it is best to ring for information on your needs. The tempting Gift Shop has many Welsh items for sale, while the the fine Cafe and Restaurant serves breakfast, lunch or high tea in the former Drawing Room. Events take place throughout the year. Open every day 10.00-17.00, Sunday hours 11am - 4pm.

Caldey Island

s imposing white facade and red turreted roofs. The Abbey Church, where the monks begin their seven daily services at 3.30am each morning, is striking in its elegant simplicity, and seems to echo the values and dedication of the monks who use it. Caldey is a monastic island, but also much more. At the top of the jetty where you come ashore, a large-scale map shows the paths and many places of interest on the island. The glorious sands of Priory Beach spread out below you as you make your way to the village. There you can enjoy a drink and a snack in the Tea Gardens, among tall pines and friendly ducks, in the pleasant surroundings of the island’s picture-book village. From the Island Post Office you can send postcards with an additional hand-franked Caldey stamp. It is also a museum, showing the heritage and history of the island and you can find out still more from the free video, showing continuously in the nearby Video Hall. The well stocked Abbey Gift Shop offers shortbread baked in the Monastery and chocolate made on the island, while in the Perfume Shop a wonderful fragrance greets you, and you can try some of the unique Caldey Abbey Perfumes, made on the island since the 1950’s. There’s a different, but equally delicious aroma in the Chocolate Factory, where a small viewing area gives a tantalising glimpse of the process in action. For those who like to get off the beaten track, a walk up to the Lighthouse offers truly spectacular panoramic views. Caldey is part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, and perhaps the best way to experience its outstanding natural beauty is to walk the waymarked Cliff Path. Atlantic grey seals can sometimes be seen basking in the sun on the rocks below. There is also a circular Woodland Walk, an easy stroll along the island’s quiet wooded paths Caldey has a surprising variety of interesting religious buildings. Just off the Lighthouse path is the Old Priory, with its medieval courtyard and leaning spire. Inside this atmospheric old limestone church stands the Ogham Stone, inscribed in ancient script, a reminder of the half-forgotten Celtic saints who once roamed these shores. The little village church of St David’s has Norman architecture, Celtic foundations and 1920’s stained glass. And on the cliff behind the beach are the Caldey Calvary and Watchtower Chapel. In this simple chapel, with its towering sea view, visitors leave messages and prayers on slips of paper, inspired perhaps by the many centuries of prayer and quiet living which seem to resonate in the very stones of this special island. Here on Caldey the monastery and ancient churches seem to combine with sea air and quiet, beautiful surroundings to create the island's unique atmosphere of timelessness and peace. It’s a place to forget the car, the crush, and the bustle of the world, where all the family can enjoy a few hours of true relaxation and peace.
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