Pubs around the end of the M4 and A48

OK so you’ve made it nearly as far as Pont Abraham and everyone is hungry but Motorway Services food just doesn’t appeal. Here is a list of pubs and cafés which are close to your route so you only have to make a slight detour to get a bite to eat.  They are listed in order so that the final pub listed is nearest to Carmarthen.

Places close by are Llanelli, Pontarddulais, Cross Hands.

All feature basic veggie dishes on the menu unless otherwise stated.

Please note that we take no responsibility for the quality of food served at these pubs and recommend that you phone in advance to reserve tables and check opening times etc.

Dollarphotoclub_44710039

End of M4

Pubs are listed in order as they occur from south to north.

If you are on your way towards Llandeilo via the A483 then there are a couple of options if you come off the M4 at Junction 48.

Location: Fforest near Pontarddulais; latlong 51.722776, -4.057111
Name: The Bird in Hand does not have its own website.   Tel:  01792 886651

Location:  Llanedi;   latlong 51.744248, -4.049132
Website:  http://tafarnyderi.co.uk     Tel:  01792 883318
Name:  Tafarn y Deri
Detail:  has a good menu with several original-looking veggie options. They cater for special diets on request.

A48

The road starts off running from south to north until it reaches Cross Hands, where it starts to curve round to the north west.

Pubs to north or east are:

Location: Gorslas to north east of Cross Hands  latlong  51.804357, -4.074917
Website:   http://www.sabrain.com/phoenix   Tel: 01269 844438
Name:     Tafarn-y-Phoenix
Detail:     Brains Brewery pub. Has large beer garden and grass for kids to play on. Food served all day Mon to Sat; Sunday 12 to 8pm.   They have a few veggie options including dish of the day. Sunday roast available.

Location: Just off A476 to northeast of Cross Hands;  latlong 51.808717, -4.078443
Website:   http://www.dayoutwiththekids.co.uk/family-fun/Llyn_Llech_Owain_Country_Park/6201
Name:   Llyn Llech Owain Country Park
Detail:   Café open April – September 10am – 6pm daily. Free entry to the park but it’s £1.50 for parking.

Location: Carmel village on A476 to northeast of Cross Hands;  latlong 51.820034, -4.048802
Website: http://www.stagandpheasantcarmel.co.uk/   Tel:  01269 844000
Name: Stag and Pheasant
Detail: Does not seem to have veggie options. Open daily and serves Sunday lunch.

Pubs to the south or west are:

Location: Foelgastell just northwest of Cross Hands   latlong 51.811791, -4.108778
Website:   http://www.thesmithsarms.co.uk/  Tel: 01269 842 213
Name:     The Smiths Arms
Details:   Food served lunchtime and evening. Not good for veggies unless you want lasagne or tagine… or a cheese sandwich for lunch.

Location: Banc-y-Mansel on B4310 between Drefach and Porthyrhyd;  latlong 51.8104387,-4.1421373
Name:  Mansel Arms   Tel: 01267 275305
Detail: Listed as one of Camra pubs of Year but has no website of its own.

Location: Porthyrhyd on B4310;   latlong 51.822459, -4.149601
Website: http://www.theabadamarms.com/ Tel: 01267 275090
Name: Abadam Arms
Detail: Not open at lunchtime on weekdays. Eve 5-11pm. Weekends 12-11pm.

Location: Llanddarog on B4310;  latlong 51.828916, -4.174307
Website:  http://www.butchersofllanddarog.co.uk/    Tel:  01267 275330
Name:  Butcher’s Arms
Details: Closed Sunday and Monday. Open lunchtime and evenings other days. They apparently have a veggie menu of the day but there is no sample displayed on their website.

To ascertain whether pub is dog-friendly, please contact the owners or licensees.

 

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The Three Sarnau

Sarn Gynfelyn, Sarn-y-Bwlch and Sarn Badrig

If you’re walking the Wales Coast Path, look out for these interesting geographical phenomena.

Described as shallow sub-tidal reefs, the three Sarns (sarnau is the plural in Welsh) extend as long, narrow strips west into Cardigan Bay and can be seen at very low tide – for example in March or September during the periods of extreme *spring tides around the spring and autumn equinoxes. They now form part of the Pen Llŷn a’r Sarnau marine Special Area of Conservation.

Sarn Gynfelyn - just visible at high tide

Sarn Gynfelyn – just visible at high tide

The sarnau are relics of moraine from the last Ice Age when glaciers moving across the area occasionally deposited loads of rock as they melted. These lines of moraine preserved in Cardigan Bay consist of boulders mixed with cobbles, pebbles and various grades of sediment, with sediment plains each side.

From south to north, the sarnau are:

Sarn Cynfelin starts just south of the farmhouse at Wallog, between Borth and Clarach and extends around 14km out to sea.
Sarn y Bwlch is near Tywyn.  It extends about 6km from Pen Bwlch Point in a south-westerly direction.
Sarn Badrig  (St Patrick’s Causeway) runs out to sea for about 20km from Mochras Point, just south of Harlech (directly west of inland village of Llanbedr).

In mythology, these sarnau are made out to be remains of ancient dams which protected the kingdom of Cantref y Gwaelod.

Around the sarnau a great diversity of algae and sea weeds thrive as well as creatures such as crustaceans, jelly fish and sea anemones.

The Sarnau seem to support good populations of pollock, bass, black bream and grey mullet which provide prey for bottlenose dolphins, porpoise and grey seal in summer, and also attract an exciting variety of seabirds all year. These include Common Scoter, Great Crested Grebe and Red Throated Diver, which all winter in the Bay.

*The word ‘spring’ in this context does not refer to the season, but rather to the action of ‘bursting out’ which results from the position of both the moon and sun in relation to that of the earth.

If you’re interested in observing some of the outstanding features of our West Wales coast, see our holiday cottages in Cardigan Bay.

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Dowrog Common, St Davids

Dowrog Common is a large lowland heath 3km north east of St Davids with a wealth of wildflowers, birds and insects.  

It is traversed by a narrow lane (not many passing places so you need to be good at reversing!).  Access is a short distance off the A487 just west of the River Alun, where you can pull in next to the cattle grid.

It has been a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) since 1954 and it is also part of the north-west Pembrokeshire Commons Special Area for conservation (SAC). The land is leased from the National Trust by the Wildlife Trust, who are dedicated to its conservation.

Flowers

Pembrokeshire heaths tend to form an intricate mosaic of dry and wet heath mixed with acid grassland and fen as well as pools.

spring-flowers-violets-5CUThese diverse habitats attract a huge variety of plant and animal life including over 350 species of flowers. Several rarities are Yellow Centaury, Pale Dog-violet, Wavy St. John’s Wort, Lesser Butterfly Orchid, Three-lobed Crowfoot and Pilwort.   Some of these are very tiny and may take some scrupulous searching, but the array of more common wild flowers in mid-summer is wonderful.

Taking a trip along the lane on Google Earth, I can see clumps of orchids on the verge and gorgeous Palamino ponies grazing in the distance. You can wander the lane for real and see the best of the species without tramping about on the heath.

Insects

A network of small freshwater pools – some of which have been excavated manually – are ideal breeding sites for insects and on summer afternoons more than 10 species of dragonfly and damselfly (both belonging to the Order of Odonata) flit around the area including Emperor and Golden Ringed dragonflies.

Golden Ringed Dragonfly

Golden Ringed Dragonfly

Devil’s Bit Scabious is the only food which proves palatable for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly caterpillars which find a niche here.  The young butterflies are brightly coloured but fade to brownish tones after a few days.  Another scarce butterfly is the Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary.

Birds

Hen Harrier (Circus cyaneus)

Female Hen Harrier

Winter is the best time to see birds of prey  here. Over most recent years there has been a roost of Hen Harriers. Although they take care to settle in a boggy and inaccessible part of the reserve, you can spot them through binoculars during late afternoon in mid winter.  You might also catch sight of a Barn Owl or Short-eared Owl and the small hawk, Merlin often puts in an appearance.

Dowrog Pool supports populations of Bewick’s and Whooper Swans, Wigeon, Teal, Shoveler and Mallard in winter, and other freshwater-loving birds such as Snipe, Water Rail, Coot and Moorhen thrive here. Grasshopper Warbler, Reed Bunting and Sedge Warbler also nest in the vegetation on the wetland areas. See our sections on Inland and Fresh Water birds.

Snipe

Snipe

 

 

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The River Taf

Many visitors to Wales will have heard of the River Taff, which rises in the Brecon Beacons and flows south through Merthyr Tydfil to Cardiff; but whilst visiting West Wales, you will discover that there is another river with a similar name, the waters and banks of which provide much to enjoy.

The River Taf (often spelt Tâf with a circumflex on the a) rises in the Preseli Hills, near Crymych in north Pembrokeshire, where it makes a dramatic change of course – hence the translation of the village name: twisted stream.

taf-estuary-1VWFlowing more or less south, it passes the village of Llanfyrnach, then turns southwest through Glandŵr and Llanglydwen; it runs south past Login to Llanfallteg, where it takes another sharp turn to the south east, continuing with many little twists and turns to Whitland. Sticking to a mainly easterly course, it passes St Clears before turning southward past Laugharne to join with its neighbours, the Towy and Gwendraeth on the last stage of their journey to Carmarthen Bay.

Along the 30 miles of its course the Taf is augmented by many minor tributaries, widening out dramatically by the time it joins with the River Cywyn, and the last 9 miles or so are tidal, creating an estuary environment which is attractive to wildfowl and waders as well as seafaring humans.

There are interesting walks in the area of the river valley including the Landsker Borderlands trail which crosses it at Login.

Beer

 

Have a pint of real ale or a meal at the Plash Inn in Llanfallteg (01437 563 472) which reputedly has a range of gluten free options on its menu.

 

The Cardi Bach Railway
Dismantled in 1963, the railway which was originally started in 1870 at Whitland to connect with Glogue slate quarries and Llanfyrnach silver lead mines, reached Crymych in 1874, and extended to Cardigan in 1886. It follows the river valley for much of its route.

Canoeing
There is a great stretch of river starting at Login. You can paddle as far as Whitland (14km) or all the way to Laugharne (32km), enjoying the peace of the river and the scenery along its banks. See the canoewales.com website for details.

Fishing
The River Taf is an excellent choice for worming, spinning and flyfishing for seatrout (sewin) and brown trout.  You can find out more on the fishingthetaf.co.uk website.  Of course it is necessary to obtain a rod licence – available from the Environment Agency and most post offices.

If you’d like to explore the Taf and its surrounding area, see our holiday cottages in Carmarthenshire for a great choice of self catering accommodation.

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Christmas Markets in West Wales

Christmas backgroundThe opportunity to visit some magnificent and historic properties, sort out the Christmas shopping and enjoy delicious local food and drink all at the same time, is one of the many reasons we love Wales.  The following Christmas markets, craft and food fairs will make finding the perfect present a pleasure.  Enjoy music and magical lighting, browse, meet friends and share some warm Welsh festive spirit.

bellPicton Castle annual Christmas Market is on Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd November from 10.30am – £6.60 per person, under 15′s £4.00, under 5’s free.

With a fantastic range of stalls in the castle this is a magical way to start the season. The castle will be dressed for a Victorian Christmas, plus Santa’s Grotto, Maria’s Mediterranean Restaurant and lots more. Entry includes  a free glass of mulled wine.

picton-in-winter-500x374

Picton Castle

Our next destination will be Pembroke Castle where the doors are open into the evenings: 28th November, 10.00am – 8.00pm, 29th November 10.0am – 7.00pm and 30th November 10.00am – 4.00pm.  The castle will be decorated and lit to provide a magical atmosphere.  Entrance is free and the charge of £1 per child for Santa’s Grotto will be donated to the Paul Sartori Foundation.

-Llanerchaeron is hosting their Christmas Food and Craft Fair on 6th and 7th December, 11.00am – 4.00pm.  £4 per adult; NT members and children free.

This is the perfect way to get into the festive spirit with a visit to this wonderful Christmas Fair.  Choose a unique gift from over 70 stalls selling the very best of local food and crafts. The house will be decorated for Christmas, there will be a visit from Father Christmas and a treasure hunt for children.  ‘Out of town’ shopping at it’s very best!

Aberglasney is holding a Traditional Winter Fair on 30th November and 1st December, 9.30am – 3.30pm.  Wander through the mansion and grounds with stalls offering gifts, crafts, decorations, Welsh food and drink and lots, lots more.  Have your photo taken with Father Christmas and his reindeer!  It promises to be a wonderful weekend.  Normal admission rates apply.  Croeso Cynnes i Pawb/A Warm Welcome to you all.

Aberglasny gardens in the snow

Aberglasney Gardens

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Gwynfryn – Renovating a West Wales house

In this post, Norma and James, the owners of Gwynfryn in New Quay, Ceredigion, share their inspiring story of saving a traditional West Wales house from dereliction, bringing it back to life and carefully maintaining its original character.
front viewWe purchased Gwynfryn in New Quay in 2003.  I think the only reason we were able to buy it was because very few people were quite as foolhardy (or naive!).  The property was in a very sad state, having been uninhabited for at least 35 years.  The council had issued the owners with a notice to renovate the property or sell as it was a serious eye-sore and becoming a danger to the neighbouring properties.

We spent 12 months renovating it, doing everything other than the electrics and plumbing ourselves.

Back gardenIt took us 3 weeks to just clear a path to the back wall of the garden.  After all that work, it was nice to see that we had quite a good sea view from there.  James repaired or re-made every single window in the house; they were in a dreadful state.  The front bay windows had become detached from the house and were moving towards the road!  James spent approximately 3 months on the windows – although UPVC replacements would have taken 3 days, we still have no regrets, the soul of the house would have been gone forever.

James workingAnother nice surprise was finding a hand-painted original (1880) border under 13 layers of wallpaper.

Beds and piles of stuffWe used as many traditional materials throughout as we could and re-used as much as possible.  It made our day to find things like the right size window panel – in the attic!  We decorated the house using lime based paints, mixing each colour by hand ourselves.  It is much easier these days to buy these traditional paints in a range of colours, but 12 years ago this was the only option available to us.  Ty Mawr lime were a great help, they even featured our bathroom in their 2005 calendar.

Featured ImageAlthough we enjoyed the project, we were very glad to finish.  It gives us great pleasure now to be able to offer other people the chance to see all of the original features and to experience the very traditional character of the house.

Bathroom

For more information, photos, prices and availability take a look at Gwynfryn on our website.

There is plenty to do in New Quay and the surrounding area if you stay at Gwynfryn or any of our holiday cottages in New Quay, take a look at Things to in Cardigan Bay.

 

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Llechryd, the River Teifi & Cilgerran – a 2 hour circular walk

Llechryd Bridge

Llechryd Bridge

This is a lovely circular walk of about 2 hours from Llechryd in North Pembrokeshire,

The sky was blue as we set off from Llechryd Bridge for our walk along the River Teifi to Cilgerran.

Golden leaves underfoot

Golden leaves underfoot

The riverside path was golden with fallen leaves…

and then we came to the mud!  Slithering and sliding we  struggled on, the mud slowly climbing its way up our boots and legs!

The river was flowing quickly and the trees shone in the sunshine, their bark covered in a velvet sleeve of glowing green moss.

Velvety Moss

Velvety Moss

As we rounded the curve in the river we saw the castle ruins high above us at Cilgerran.  There are several sketches and a painting by Turner of Cilgerran Castle in the Tate’s Prints and Drawings Rooms, painted in about 1798.

Turner painted Cilgerran Castle

Turner painted Cilgerran Castle

In the summer months open air performances are held in the castle grounds, making for a spectacular setting and glorious views.  We have often spent wonderful evenings with a picnic watching plays and other entertainment.

After about 45 minutes we reached the car park beneath the castle where we had a brief breather before starting the climb up to the village along the lane.  The reward is a drink either at one of the village pubs, or even an ice cream at the village shop that greets the weary walker at the top!

A docile little dog? No – wildly territorial with a huge bark!

 

When we got our breath back, the walk continued along the small lanes before branching down to the sweetest little hamlet where this mischievous dog waited until we were walking alongside his house before barking madly at us and running up and down the garden.

We walked back to the car past The Smallest Museum in Wales.

A lovely walk to try when you’re staying in a Cardigan holiday cottage or North Pembrokeshire holiday cottage

 

 

 

 

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The Oystercatcher: a wading bird to see in West Wales

The Oystercatcher is the wading bird which you’re most likely to see on our West Wales coast – particularly around the mouth of estuaries such as the Teifi, Tywi and Dyfi.

The birds form huge flocks in winter and smaller groups in summer, and you’ll often hear them before they come into view making their typical screaming ‘peep’. Although their plumage is strikingly black and white, they sometimes look all-over dark if viewed against the light. They are about the size of a pigeon.

oystercatchers-flyingWOVThey do not breed in West Wales, but nest on the ground at inland sites. Chicks are extremely cute and emerge from the egg running and able to forage for their own food immediately.

Watch the birds come whizzing in towards a sandbank and you’ll see how they seem to fall in a jumble, running along the sand.

They argue amongst themselves and chase off other waders, piping and clamouring to establish dominance. They are not averse to stealing food from each other as well as other species – quite aggressive in their behaviour!

oystercatcher

The Oystercatcher’s bill is long, straight and bright orange – strong and powerful for prising open the shells of molluscs – particularly cockles and mussels. It also eats other invertebrates which it digs out of the mud but doesn’t eat oysters!

A remarkable fact about these birds is that they display resource polymorphism: the bills of individual birds develop differently, allowing them to attack their prey in different ways. Three types of feeder have been observed within the common Oystercatcher population:

1)   Stabbers – these get hold of a big mussel and stab at the join of the two shells to prise them apart.
2)   Hammerers – their bill is thicker and more robust. They lay the mussel on its side and smash into it.
3)   Tweezers – a fine, delicate bill ideally adapted to poking into sand for worms. Usually females.

This information is thanks to a fascinating report on the BBC Autumnwatch programme, which also provided the amazing fact that the Oystercatchers’ bills grow at a rate of up to 0.4mm each day – 3 times the speed of human fingernails. On top of that, they can even change their bill type within 10 days in order to adapt to new feeding grounds: a hammerer can become a stabber in just under 2 weeks!

So if you’ve got a good pair of binoculars and a fortnight to spend on the West Wales coast, you could be a witness to a flock of Oystercatchers changing their feeding technique…

To find out more about the birds you might see in West Wales,  take a look at our Birdwatching section. To choose a cottage for your birdwatching holiday, add your requirements to filter the full list of our holiday cottages in West Wales

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West Wales Holiday Cottages and the 2014 Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards

Clydey Cottages presented with Gold Award by David Witt of West Wales Holiday Cottages in the 2014 Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards

Clydey Cottages win Gold for Best Non-Serviced Accommodation in 2014 Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards

We were delighted to sponsor the award for Best Non-Serviced Accommodation in the 2014 Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards. It was a chance for us to help shine a spotlight on the very best of Pembrokeshire’s self-catering accommodation. This award is an excellent way to draw attention to the outstanding quality of holiday cottages in the area.

We donned our best bib and tucker to attend the awards ceremony at the Wolfscastle Country Hotel on 9 October 2014. David Witt, as our Senior Partner, presented the awards for the Best Non-Serviced Accommodation with the gold award going to Clydey Cottages and silver to both East Jordeston Cottages and Hayston Holiday Cottage; they are all very deserving winners.

If you take a look at the details for East Jordeston Cottages, you’ll see why they so richly deserved to win an award. Take a look at The Lodge, their newest cottage, it’s amazing!

We were pleased to see some of our other cottage owners accepting awards on the night, including the owners of Asheston Eco Barns who won silver in Best Access for the Disabled Visitor and the owners of Rock Cottage whose B&B won silver in Finest Pembrokeshire Breakfast. Our warmest congratulations to all the Pembrokeshire award winners.

Of course, on the big night, the greatest excitement for us was that West Wales Holiday Cottages won the Bronze Award for Best Customer Service Team: we were thrilled! We would like to say a big ‘thank you’ to all our customers – we know it is your kind support that brings us these awards and we are grateful that you are always so generous. Thank you!

West Wales Holiday Cottages team with bronze award for Best Customer Service Team in 2014 Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards

Our award-winning team! Dawn, Sarah, David, Matthew and Linda

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Out of Season – A Special Time in West Wales

A visit to West Wales has special attractions at different times of year. Out of season – in the autumn, winter and spring – many of them are connected with nature.

Out of season Wales

Does it rain all the time? Does it blow a gale every day? Will you be snowed in and not be able to get home? Not really likely is the answer to each. We don’t get much snow in West Wales, and even if there is wild and wintry weather, it comes with its particular kind of excitement.

Surfers will already be familiar with the delights of a rough sea as well as the possible dangers, but landlubbers can enjoy watching the waves crashing up against the cliffs enclosing a rocky cove or really blow the cobwebs away by going for a wild and windy walk across the beach or along the myriad country footpaths.

Blue sea and beachcombing

Icicles Above a Rushing StreamIn the calm after the storm you can enjoy the contrast of a sparkling blue sea stretching way into the distance from your vantage point on the coast path. Descend to the shore to indulge in some beachcombing amongst the exciting debris washed up by the high tides. If you happen to be visiting at a time of heavy frost, then there is the chance to see the most spectacular icicles and sheets of ice cracking across the curves of an estuary channel like water icing flowing down the sides of a cake: a photographer’s dream.

However you choose to spend your time out of doors, it’s always great to return to a cosy holiday cottage with wood burning stove or open fire or maybe just pile into one of the characterful pubs in the area where you can thaw out whilst sampling the local fare and ales.

Treasures of the low seasons

red-fungus-CUIn autumn after the last of the blackberries there is still the chance to encounter a huge variety of fungi on the verges, in the woods or on the pastures of West Wales. Of course you shouldn’t cook any up for supper unless you’re really sure, but you may be lucky enough to visit at a time when organised foraging expeditions are on offer in the area.

Many edible plants – including seaweeds – are to be found on our lanes and beaches, among them Pennywort (also known as Navelwort) and sorrel – growing in abundance on many verges of quiet country lanes. The best times to find these are spring and winter respectively.

The trees without leaves reveal their individual shapes and subtle colours, many with trunks cloaked in moss and twigs dripping with lichens.   You can see further into the distance in winter by peeking through to the other side of a wood or spinney rather than having your view blocked by the leaves.

gwaun-valley-5CU

Wildlife

Of course if there’s been some rain then the waterfalls are much more spectacular, although they can be a trial for salmon trying to swim upriver to spawn. You can see them making numerous attempts to advance up the River Teifi at the falls near Cenarth Bridge.

Between September and December, baby grey seals can be seen in the bays of West Wales. They are often to be seen lying alone on the stones – but don’t worry that they have been abandoned as the mother has to go off fishing in the sea and keeps a close eye on her pup.

seal & baby-1JB Featured Image copyThere are exciting bird-watching opportunities, as you may catch sight of flocks of migrating birds or an occasional rarity which has been blown off-course.   In colder weather, you can be lucky to spot flocks of redwings and fieldfares greedily devouring the berries on a holly tree; a group of long-tailed tits or many other small birds, waders and birds of prey.  See our Birds to see in Winter page.

One of the most marvellous winter treats is to be in just the right place at dusk. Near the Teifi marshes in Cardigan or the pier in Aberystwyth you can see great murmurations (flocks) of Starlings as they gather near their roosts, swooping and flowing in great spools like a pixelated cloud of dissolving ink.

Starlings at DuskDon’t forget that your dog will be welcome on many more beaches out of season so bring it along too! We have a wide range of dog friendly cottages for you to choose from. Many cottages are available for short breaks as well as longer stays out of season so you can grab a weekend away or take a midweek break. Choose from our full list of cottages in West Wales.

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